Advanced Dungeons & Dragons

Two months ago, I kicked off my #CuratedQuarantine series with the original white boxed set for Dungeons & Dragons. That was indeed my first RPG and my first hobby game as well. It was 1979 and I was 10 years old. I was excited by the idea of D&D and I could tell there was something cool in those three small books, but the white boxed set was in no way designed to introduce 10 years to gaming. It came out of the 60s wargaming scene and it was written for that audience. So my brother and I quickly got the Holmes Basic Set, which was a much better introduction (though we got the version that came with chits instead of dice!) and then jumped right into Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. That’s what I want to talk about today.

The classic three core rulebooks for AD&D were published between 1977 and 1979, so perfect timing for me. Surprisingly, it was the Monster Manual (1977) that came first, then the Player’s Handbook (1978), and finally the Dungeon Master’s Guide (1979). When I say that D&D changed my life, it’s really AD&D that I’m talking about. This was my favorite game and by far my most played RPG from 1979 to 1985 or so (by which point I was branching out much more). Many people slightly younger than me have this same nostalgia for the red box Basic Rules (1983) but I never picked them up back then because I (at the wise age of 14) considered them “kiddie stuff.” I was a veteran of Advanced D&D, what did I need dumbed down rules for? As an adult, I would gain a healthy respect for the BECMI rules and today I would take the Rules Cyclopedia as a desert island game, but I digress.

The reason AD&D was so important to me is that, in addition to the fun of playing, it was a gateway to so many other things. I was already a Tolkien fan, but AD&D led me to Michael Moorcock, Fritz Leiber, H.P. Lovecraft, Poul Anderson, and many other authors. It also got me reading things like Beowulf and the Song of Roland at a young age. And it only amplified my desire to read more ancient and medieval history. Naturally, I also became a Dragon Magazine subscriber (had to get the official word from Gary Gygax!), and that introduced me to the wider world of hobby games. Many of the games I have covered in my Curated Quarantine series I first learned about in the pages of Dragon. That’s how I was introduced to wargames like Squad Leader and Dawn Patrol.

AD&D also got me into my other lifelong obsession: miniatures. It started with minis to use with AD&D from Grenadier, Ral Partha, and Heritage. Then I got the AD&D Battleystem when it came out in 1985. I was going to say it was my first minis game but I that’s not quite true. I had Chainmail, the minis game that was D&D’s precursor, but never played it. We did use its jousting tables in our AD&D games though. Battlesystem is the first minis game I actually played, and that hobby has been its own long and rewarding journey.

When I was 12, I fantasized about one day writing an article for Dragon Magazine. Why, I might make a $100! This is the first time I remember thinking about game writing as a thing I might do. Many years later I would indeed write articles for Dragon. When I was hired into the TSR Product Group of Wizards of the Coast in 1998, I’d also get to write for AD&D itself. 10-year-old me surely couldn’t have imagined I’d one day get to contribute to the game I so loved. When my first book (the AD&D Guide to Hell) was published in 1999, it was pretty damn cool to see my name under the AD&D masthead. Getting to write (with Sean Reynolds) Slavers, a sequel to the Slavelords modules I had enjoyed so much as a youngster was also a highlight.

People have spilled an endless amount of ink on the warts and flaws of AD&D, the various misguided TSR policies, the way Dave Arneson was sidelined, and a host of other related topics. And I get it. I do. But AD&D is a portal I’ll always be glad I walked though.

Rush and the 80s Nerd

I got into punk when I was 15 years old and never looked back. I bang on about it all the time, so if you know anything about my musical taste, it’s my 35 years in the punk rock trenches. What you may not know is that before I saw D.O.A., Black Flag, Marginal Man, and a bunch of other bands that changed my life, I had a progressive rock phase. It’s weird, I know, because punk was in part a reaction to the excesses of the prog rock scene in the 70s, but back at my parents’ house you can still find my dusty King Crimson, ELP, and Yes albums. My absolute favorite band at the time, however, was Rush.

As I’m sure you’ve heard, Rush’s drummer and lyricist Neil Peart died last week, and this caused me to think about the band’s impact on my early teenage years. The first album I bought with my own money was Moving Pictures. The first arena rock concert I ever went to was Rush (December 15, 1982 at the Worcester Centrum). I remember getting into heated arguments with my classmates, who didn’t understand why Alex Lifeson was obviously the greatest guitarist in rock and roll (a very 8th grade conversation). Rush was the first band I was passionate about, full stop.

On reflection I realized it was more than music for me though. Rush was an integral part of my life at an important time. They were my favorite band from roughly ages 11-13 and what else was going on that period? Well, when I was 10 years old I first read the Lord of the Rings. That same year I started to play Dungeons & Dragons and it soon became my obsession. And to me at the time this was all part of a greater whole. One of the reasons Rush appealed to me is that their lyrics were tailor made for fans of fantasy, scifi, and roleplaying. They had a song about Rivendell on Fly by Night! The Necromancer on Caress of Steel was basically a D&D adventure, three men of Willowdale on a quest to defeat an evil sorcerer. And 2112, of course, was a science fiction tour de force. Those years were about reading Tolkien, Moorcock, and Leiber, playing D&D, and listening to Rush. This cocktail would be formative for me and lead ultimately to my career as a RPG designer and publisher. “Square for battle, let the fray begin!”

As it turns out, my experience was not uncommon for nerds of the early 80s. The thing is I had no idea this was the case at the time. This was before the internet so I had no easy way to connect with members of my tribe. The only other gamers I knew were the people in my home town. My only window into the wider world of gaming was reading Dragon Magazine, and even in the letters section there was little talk about contemporary music (more important to argue about the alignment system or rollplaying vs. roleplaying, don’t you know). I was isolated in a suburb of Boston, part of a subculture that was derided and attacked as Satanic, and nobody outside my circle of friends thought D&D was cool (and certainly nobody in Hollywood did!). The song Subdivisions, as you might guess, spoke to me when Signals came out. “Nowhere is the dreamer or the misfit so alone.”

Those heady years were important but they passed. As I was getting into punk rock, Rush was really embracing the synthesizer and that just didn’t do anything for me. I wanted guitar-driven music, harder and faster. I wanted music more in tune with my angry leftism, not Ayn Rand’s poisonous bullshit. So I said goodbye to prog rock and hello to punk and hardcore (and a subculture even more reviled than D&D!). While I would never revisit most of those bands, Rush proved the exception. Their 70s records were something I always went back to. A few years ago Rush did their final tour and I actually considered going. I hadn’t seen them since 1984 and thought it might be fun to relive those days. Unfortunately, their Seattle area show happened when I was at GenCon. Ironic, that it was gaming that kept me away.

When I was 12, I had this fantasy. There were no game conventions near me and I’d certainly never been to one. I could only read about GenCon in Dragon and dream. Well, what if I organized my own convention? And what if I got Rush as the musical guest? Surely this was something a 12 year old could pull off! Now yes, this was completely ridiculous, but it shows you what was going on in my head. Music and games and fiction were sparking dreams and creativity, and from those early beginnings I’d make a career and a life. So thank you Neil, Alex, and Geddy for getting into my brain and giving me a soundtrack for my first adventures. In the early 80s Rush was more than just music for me and I know I’m not alone in that.

The Sha’ir for Fantasy AGE

We are in the process of reviving our old game group, and a few weeks ago we got together to talk about what we might want to play. I was surprised that the most popular choice was Al-Qadim, TSR’s Arabian D&D setting from the early 90s. It’s something I’ve always liked but never got to play, so I didn’t take much convincing to GM it. I decided, however, to use my own Fantasy AGE rules rather than D&D. I didn’t want to use Second Edition AD&D and if I was going to spend time converting things, I’d rather do it for Fantasy AGE than Fifth Edition.

For the most part, converting material over is easy enough. Turns out I was a little cavalier about handling the sha’ir though. As they are a key element of Al-Qadim and Nicole wanted to play one, I definitely wanted to include sha’ir in the campaign. I sat down this weekend and took a first crack at doing so and I figured I might as well toss them up on my long-neglected blog so other folks could have a look. I decided early on that I wanted to make sha’ir a mage specialization but figuring out how to best represent their various abilities in Fantasy AGE took some consideration. I ultimately decided to make a lot of their abilities spells and created a Genie Arcana to house them.

Old Al-Qadim fans may note a couple of things. First, I cut down the amount of time it takes gen to find spells for the sha’ir. This at least gives a chance for a mage to get a Novice spell during a combat encounter, though more powerful spells must be sought during narrative time. Second, since sha’ir is simply a specialization for the mage class, this means they will have regular spells to cast. Basically, I wanted to make sure they had something more than arcane blast to play with while the gen was off fetching other spells. Since the core sha’ir abilities require both an arcana and a specialization though, I don’t think they’ll overpower other kinds of mages.

The rules I designed follow. First there’s the Genie Arcana and its spells, then the sha’ir specialization and the rules for gen fetching spells. Enjoy!

Genie Arcana

You know the magic of the fabled genie. You can summon, bargain with, and sometimes command genie, though you must always keep your wits about you.

Novice: You learn the spells summon gen and summon jann.

Journeyman: You learn the spell summon genie. You gain the focus Intelligence (Genie Arcana).

Master: You learn the spell bind genie. You can also choose one spell stunt you can perform for –1 SP when casting Genie Arcana spells.

Summon Gen

Requirements: Genie Arcana (Novice)

Spell Type: Utility

MP Cost: 2

Casting Time: Minor Action

Target Number: 9

Test: None

Description: You summon and bind a small elemental familiar known as a gen. The first time you cast this spell, you choose a type of gen: daolanin (Earth), djinnling (Air), effreetkin (Fire), or maridan (Water). This first casting takes 3d6 hours and allows you to find and bind a gen, who becomes your willing servant thenceforth, and can subsequently be summoned as a minor action as indicated above. This is a specific gen, so name them! Your gen remains with you unless dismissed (a free action), banished back to its elemental plane (by having its Health reduced to 0), or sent on an errand (such as fetching a spell for a sha’ir). If dismissed or banished, you can summon your gen again by casting this spell.

Summon Janni

Requirements: Genie Arcana (Novice)

Spell Type: Utility

MP Cost: 5

Casting Time: Major Action

Target Number: 11

Test: None

Description: You cast this spell and yell for aid, and all jann within 10 miles hear the call. If there are any in the area (GM’s discretion; jann are typically found in forlorn places), a single janni will appear. They can help lost travelers and provide some basic hospitality. Beyond that, the janni must be negotiated with for any additional aid. This spell compels them in no way. Should you ever attack a summoned janni, this spell will automatically fail for you until you make restitution to the jann, which should be an adventure in itself.

Summon Genie

Requirements: Genie Arcana (Journeyman)

Spell Type: Utility

MP Cost: 12

Casting Time: 1d6 minutes

Target Number: 15

Test: None

Description: This spell allows you to summon a genie from the elemental planes. You can choose to summon a dao (Earth), djinn (Air), efreet (Fire), or marid (Water). You gain a +2 bonus to the casting roll if the genie is of the same element as your gen familiar. YIf the casting roll is successful, the genie appears in 1d6 rounds. Then it is up to you to negotiate with the genie; the spell does not compel them to help you. You may be able to convince them to aid you, though bribes are more common. Threats can also be effective, but you must tread carefully. Genies consider it rude to cast this spell more than once a week. Each attempt after the first suffers a cumulative -2 penalty on its casting roll.

Bind Genie

Requirements: Genie Arcana (Master)

Spell Type: Utility

MP Cost: 20

Casting Time: 1d6 minutes

Target Number: 15

Test: Opposed Communication (Bargaining)

Description: You may attempt to bind a genie within 10 yards of you into service for up to 101 days. You gain a +2 bonus to the casting roll if the genie is of the same element as your gen familiar but suffer a -5 penalty instead if you’ve ever used a genie prison on this type of genie. The casting time represents a negotiation between you and the genie, during which you settle on the conditions of the genie’s service. Make an opposed Communication (Bargaining) test. If you win, the genie can set 1d6 conditions to service. If the genie wins, there are 1d6+4 conditions. See page 106 of Arabian Adventures for typical conditions. You can only have one genie bound into service at a time.

Sha’ir

Mage Specialization

A sha’ir is a mage well-versed in the magic and customs of genies. Their elemental familiars can travel beyond the Land of Fate to recover spells for the sha’ir’s use. More powerful sha’irs can summon and even bind powerful genies.

Sha’ir Talent

Classes: Mage

Requirements: You must have at least the novice degree of the Genie Arcana talent and one of the elemental arcana talents (Air, Earth, Fire, or Water). You must also have the Intelligence (Genie Lore) focus.

Novice: You can send your gen to the elemental planes to find a specific spell for you. See the Gen and Spells section for details.

Journeyman: You gain protection against elemental attacks. You get a +1 bonus to resist spells from the Air, Earth, Fire, and Water arcana. Elementals of all types suffer a -1 penalty on attack rolls and a -2 on damage rolls when targeting you.

Master: You can create a genie prison. This requires 3d6 days and a successful TN 13 Intelligence (Genie Arcana) test. If successful, the genie prison can be used when you encounter a genie (whether through summoning or happenstance). If you successfully cast bind genie and they fail a Willpower (Self-Discipline) test vs. your Spellpower, the genie becomes bound in your prison. If you fail the casting roll or the genie resists the spell, they realize what you are trying to and turn hostile. Note that this use of bind genie requires no negotiation, as you are using magical means to compel them into the prison.

Gen and Spells

The defining feature of the sha’ir is the ability to send gen to the elemental planes to bring back spells that can then be cast. This takes time but has the advantage of allowing the sha’ir to cast spells they don’t know and from arcana they have not studied. Dispatching a gen to find a spell is a minor action and each attempt takes an amount of time dependent on the type of spell requested. If you make a successful Intelligence (Genie Arcana) test, the gen returns in the time indicated on the following table with the requested spell. The degree of success on the test indicates how many hours you have to cast the spell and you can only do so once. If you haven’t cast it before the time elapses, the spell is lost.

Type of Spell                     Test TN                Time to Fetch Spell

Novice                                10                          1d6 rounds

Journeyman                       12                          1d6 minutes

Master                                14                          1d6 hours

A sha’ir must be at least a level 5 mage to request Journeyman spells and a level 10 mage to request Master spells. Barring this restriction, any spell from the Fantasy AGE Basic Rulebook and Fantasy AGE Companion can be requested. Special or unique spells outside of these arcana can only be requested if the sha’ir has witnessed them being cast.

Gen stats to follow later.

The War for Svarog Prime

A few months ago Games Workshop put out a campaign system for Warhammer 40,000 called Urban Conquest and I decided to run a campaign for Pike & Shots, the wargaming club some friends and I started a couple of years back. Urban Conquest is designed for a maximum of four players. It uses color-coded physical components so it’s not a simple matter to just add more competing factions. I thus decided to run it for teams of two so I could accommodate eight players. I will be the referee, and I’ll also be playing AdMech and Planetary Defense Forces in special scenarios so I can get some games in too (though obviously, I won’t be scoring and can’t win the campaign!).

One-off games are great and all, but what makes campaigns fun is the narrative. After finding out what armies everyone wanted to play, I sat down to write up a background. This sets up the start of the campaign and will be built on as we start playing games. The challenging aspect of this campaign is that I ended up with six players who wanted to play marines. I tried to take some inspiration from the late (and sorely missed) Alan Bligh’s terrific Badab War books from Forge World, which featured many marines chapters squaring off against each other. The resulting narrative is below. It’s thick with 40K lore. I know you’d expect no less from me! I hope to provide some updates here as the campaign goes on, since I’ve dreadfully neglected my blog the last few years.

Campaign Background

Svarog is a mining planet in Segmentum Tempestus. When the Cicatrix Maledictum tore reality apart and cut off half the galaxy from Terra and the light of the Astronomican, the importance of Svarog to the Imperium increased greatly. A small fleet of Adeptus Mechanicus vessels, on the run since Tyranid Hive Fleet Leviathan destroyed their Forge World of Gryphonne IV, was directed to Svarog to expand its manufacturing output. Soon Svarog was not just mining raw materials but producing weapons of war for the Indomitus Crusade of Roboute Guilliman. It made important contributions to the rebuilding of the Crimson Fists on (relatively) nearby Rynn’s World.

As the Indomitus Crusade wound down, a political rift began to develop on Svarog. The Gryphonne IV contingent, led by Tech-Priest Dominus Zephyrus Omicron, had been crucial to the development of Svarog but the planetary governor, Jasper Tarrant, increasingly felt the Mechanicus was trying to take over the planet and turn it into a new Forge World. When word came to Jasper Tarrant that Mechanicus drilling machines were operating directly beneath Svarog Prime, the planet’s capital city, tensions only increased. When Jasper Tarrant confronted Zephyrus Omicron, the Tech-Priest flatly refused to explain the nature of the operation, only asserting that it was vital to the defense of the Imperium.

Jasper Tarrant was not convinced and began to make continency plans for ejecting the Mechanicus from Svarog. For this he would need a war chest, so he began to play a dangerous game. The governor started interfering in the planet’s trade contracts directly. Essentially, he was selling the same war material to multiple parties, getting paid many times over for goods he simply could not deliver. He thought he could make excuses long enough to enact his plan to get rid of the Mechanicus, and then make things right after the fact. This may have worked if he was dealing with the Imperial Guard. Unfortunately for Svarog, Jasper Tarrant was instead trying to cheat space marines like the Blood Angels, Iron Hands, and Dark Angels.

Meanwhile, the Mechanicus continued to drill beneath Svarog Prime. They had discovered Necron ruins on the planet and believed an ancient Necron weapon might be buried beneath the city. Their hope was to find something that could bring ruin to the Tyranids that had destroyed their home planet but they kept their goals to themselves. What Zephyrus Omicron had told Jasper Tarrant was true, such a weapon could indeed help defend the Imperium. The secrecy of the Mechanicus, however, was to have disastrous consequences.

From Sparks to Flame

The campaign that would turn Svarog Prime into a warzone began both above and below the city. The Crimson Fists and Raptors were about to begin a campaign together and had sent ships to Svarog to pick up supplies. Due to Svarog’s long relationship with the Crimson Fists, the governor had always played straight with the them so what they were promised was indeed ready for them. The trouble began when ships of four other space marine chapters arrived demanding the war materials that they had already paid for. One of the new Primaris chapters and the Iron Hands showed up first, followed quickly by a task force of Blood Angels and Dark Angels. Svarog could supply only one of the three space marine battle groups and the governor began to try to play them off one another. When things became heated, he called upon his longtime allies in the Crimson Fists to protect Svarog from what he described as near piracy form the other chapters. It is unclear if the shooting started by mistake or was intentional, but several of Svarog’s defense satellites did open fire and this began a confused void battle above the planet.

Meanwhile, the Mechanicus had broken into ancient Necron caverns beneath the surface. There they found the substance blackstone in abundance and began to experiment with it. This had two immediate and terrible consequences. First, their initial efforts attuned the blackstone the wrong way, so it became a warp magnifier instead of a warp dampener. A blast of warp power killed or drove insane all the astropaths on and above the planet and created inference that crippled communication. Then daemons from the Siren’s Storm (a nearby warp storm) began to pour into the caverns. Second, a Necron stasis crypt deeper in the ruins—alerted by the Mechanicus incursion—started its revivification cycle.

In between the forces above and the forces below lies the city of Svarog Prime. The marines deploy to the surface to try to seize the war material they are owed, while the daemons and Necrons swarm up to the surface. With communication nearly impossible, chaos reigns in Svarog Prime. Forces are scattered and no one understands the complete picture. Marines fight marines while a few streets away Necrons are reaping all from life hab blocks of terrified workers. The forces that might hold the Imperial factions together—the Adeptus Mechanicus and the Administratum—are suspicious of one another and uncertain who to trust in the sudden maelstrom of war. The campaign for Svarog Prime has begun.